Contributor essay
by
Viktoria Tkaczyk
The Max Planck Institute for the History of Science’s database “Sound & Science: Digital Histories” is an initiative of the Research Group “Epistemes of Modern Acoustics.” This resource provides access to sources in the history of acoustics, including a multimedia archive of primary source material, documentation of surviving technology, and historical reenactments of experiments in acoustics.
Contributor essay
by
Xiaochang Li

The AT&T Archives and History Center contains a sprawling collection of material from the company’s corporate and research activities extending back to the

Contributor essay
by
Christina Dörfling

When the musician Oskar Sala, co-developer and only player of the electronic instrument Trautonium, died on February 26, 2002, aged ninety-one, he had long since settled his legacy.

Contributor essay
by
Roland Wittje, Indian Institute of Technology Madras

In the 1920s, electrical companies in Europe and North America started to develop large sound amplification systems for a variety of public spaces, such as public squares, town halls, theaters, cinemas, sports arenas, and churches.

Contributor essay
by
David Pantalony; Erich Weidenhammer; Victoria Fisher

The University of Toronto acoustics collection consists of a comprehensive series of instruments made in the Parisian workshop of Rudolph Koenig (1832

Contributor essay
by
Paolo Brenni

The scientific instruments used for research and teaching in the nineteenth and early twentieth century are beautiful and fascinating artifacts.

Contributor essay
by
Fabian Voigtschild, Jonathan Sterne, Mara Mills

Since the beginnings of mechanical sound recording, playback rate and pitch were linked: increase the speed from the speed at which the sound was recorded and the pitch of the recording goes up; decrease the speed,

Contributor essay
by
David Pantalony

The spherical acoustic resonator was one of the foundational instruments of nineteenth-century physics, physiology, and psychology.

Contributor essay
by
Katharina Preller

For forty-five years, Hermann von Helmholtz taught physiology, anatomy, and physics at several universities.

Contributor essay
by
Nikita Braguinski

The holdings of the Audio Communication Group of the Technische Universität Berlin (TU) go back to the 1950s and 1960s.